Advertisement

Gender representation amongst editorials boards in United Kingdom surgical specialty journals

Published:October 13, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2022.10.003

      Abstract

      Females remain under-represented in surgery in the United Kingdom and around the globe. Gender representation on journal editorial boards is one of the key metrics of gender representation within academic surgery. The aim of this study was to quantify gender representation within the editorial leadership of journals affiliated with UK surgical specialties. A web-based search for each of the UK surgical specialty associations was conducted, followed by identification of the endorsed journals for each one. As of August 2022, data on the gender of the editor-in-chief and other journal leadership positions, including associate, section, and deputy editors, were collated. Gender classification was completed using first-name recognition, verified by a web search using the name and institution provided. Managing editors without clinical backgrounds were excluded. Ten journals were identified for the following surgical specialties: General Surgery, Trauma and Orthopaedics, Neurosurgery, Cardiothoracic, Urology, Paediatric Surgery, Ear Nose and Throat, Oral and Maxillofacial, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and Vascular Surgery. In total, 242 editorial positions were identified: 207 were held by males (82.8%) and 35 by females (17.2%). There were no female editors-in-chief. The average female proportion of editorial leadership per journal was 18.8%. One journal had no female editorial leadership representation. Overall, the number of females in editorial leadership positions is comparable to the current proportion of UK female consultant surgeons (13.7%). Journals with an under-representation of females in senior editorial leadership positions compared with the parent specialty should consider initiatives that will encourage diversity, promote greater gender parity, and champion female representation.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

      1. NHS workforce statistics - March 2022 (including selected provisional statistics for April 2022) - NHS Digital 2022. Available from URL: https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/nhs-workforce-statistics/march-2022 (last accessed 21 October 2022).

        • Moberly T.
        Number of women entering medical school rises after decade of decline.
        BMJ. 2018; 360k254
      2. HE students by CAH level 1 and sex. Higher Education Statistics Authority. Available from URL: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/students/what-study (last accessed 21 October 2022).

      3. Students in higher education 2010/11. Higher Education Statistics Authority, 2012. Available from URL: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/publications/students-2010-11 (last accessed 21 October 2022).

        • Newman T.H.
        • Parry M.G.
        • Zakeri R.
        • et al.
        Gender diversity in UK surgical specialties: a national observational study.
        BMJ Open. 2022; 12: e055516
      4. Royal College of Surgeons of England. The Royal College - our professional home. An independent review on diversity and inclusion for the Royal College of Surgeons of England. An exciting call for radical change. March 2021. Available from URL: file:///C:/Users/User/Downloads/RCS%20England%20diversity%20report%2011%20August.pdf (last accessed 21 October 2022).

      5. Royal College of Surgeons of England. Statistics: women in surgery. Available from: https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/careers-in-surgery/women-in-surgery/statistics (last accessed 21 October 2022).

        • Skinner H.
        • Burke J.R.
        • Young A.L.
        • et al.
        Gender representation in leadership roles in UK surgical societies.
        Int J Surg. 2019; 67: 32-36
        • Skinner H.
        • Bhatti F.
        Women in surgery.
        Bull R Col Surg Eng. 2019; 101: 12-14
      6. Inclusion, equity and diversity. British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 2022. Available from URL: https://www.baoms.org.uk/about/inclusion_equity_and_diversity.aspx#collapse0 (last accessed 21 October 2022).

        • Holman L.
        • Stuart-Fox D.
        • Hauser C.E.
        The gender gap in science: how long until women are equally represented?.
        PLOS Biol. 2018; 16: e2004956
        • Harris C.A.
        • Banerjee T.
        • Cramer M.
        • et al.
        Editorial (spring) board? Gender composition in high-impact general surgery journals over 20 years.
        Ann Surg. 2019; 269: 582-588
        • Ehrlich H.
        • Nguyen J.
        • Sutherland M.
        • et al.
        Gender distribution among surgical journals’ editorial boards: empowering women surgeon scientists.
        Surgery. 2021; 169: 1346-1351
      7. Active physicians by sex and specialty, 2017. AAMC 2017. Available from URL: https://www.aamc.org/data-reports/workforce/interactive-data/active-physicians-sex-and-specialty-2017 (last accessed 21 October 2022).

        • Peel J.K.
        • Schlachta C.M.
        • Alkhamesi N.A.
        A systematic review of the factors affecting choice of surgery as a career.
        Can J Surg. 2018; 61: 58-67