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What are the concerns of second-degree medical students entering into speciality OMFS training?

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Both Ibrar Perwaiz and Umar Rehman contributed equally to the work and are joint first authors.
    Ibrar Perwaiz
    Footnotes
    1 Both Ibrar Perwaiz and Umar Rehman contributed equally to the work and are joint first authors.
    Affiliations
    Foundation Year One Doctor, Department of General Surgery, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Huddersfield, United Kingdom
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Both Ibrar Perwaiz and Umar Rehman contributed equally to the work and are joint first authors.
    Umar Rehman
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Footnotes
    1 Both Ibrar Perwaiz and Umar Rehman contributed equally to the work and are joint first authors.
    Affiliations
    Core Surgical Trainee, Department of Surgery, Northwick Park Hospital, London, United Kingdom
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  • Mohammad Sohaib Sarwar
    Affiliations
    Locum Clinical Fellow, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, United Kingdom
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  • Peter A Brennan
    Affiliations
    Honorary Professor of Surgery, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, United Kingdom
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Both Ibrar Perwaiz and Umar Rehman contributed equally to the work and are joint first authors.
Published:December 16, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2022.12.001

      Abstract

      Introduction

      Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) applicants are faced with numerous challenges. Previous research demonstrates that the financial burden, length of OMFS training and impact on personal life are cited as major drawbacks to pursuing this speciality. With trainees previously having concerns about the Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) examinations. The current study aims to explore the concerns of second-degree medical students in trying to obtain a speciality training post in OMFS.

      Methodology

      An online survey was distributed via social media to second-degree students across the United Kingdom. A total of 106 responses were received.

      Results

      A lack of publications and involvement in research (54%) as well as attaining accreditation with the Royal College of Surgeons (27%) were cited as the primary and secondary concerns in relation to securing a higher training post. 75% of respondents had no first author publications. 93% of respondents expressed concerns about passing the MRCS examination. 73% had >40 OMFS procedures within their logbook.

      Conclusion

      Second-degree medical students reported having ample clinical and operative experience in OMFS. Their main concerns were in research and MRCS exams. To alleviate concerns by second-degree students with research and MRCS second-degree, BAOMS led educational initiatives and dedicated mentorship programmes for second-degree students and collaborative approach and discussion with major postgraduate training stakeholders.

      Keywords

      Abbreviations:

      BAOMS (British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons), OMFS (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat), MRCS (Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons), ST1 (Specialist Training One), ST3 (Specialist Training Three)
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